Son of God: Eternal, One Essence with the Father, Creator, Incarnate, Redeemer, Sustainer, Ruler

Merry Christmas: The ONE Chapters

[Notice that these four chapters go together, and each is the first chapter in a pertinent book of the Bible regarding the Incarnation. YOU’LL NEED TO MEDITATE ON THIS TABLE to benefit. But notice that the colors of each column go together, and that the whole table is about the Son of God: Green = the Son as creator; orange = deity of the Son; purple = the Son upholding all things by His providential omnipotence; red = redemption. How could four different human authors arrive at the same truth independent of one another 1,500 years apart  unless there was One Source (2 Peter 1:19-21).]

GENESIS ONE

JOHN ONE

COLOSSIANS ONE

HEBREWS ONE

1 In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. 2 The earth was without form, and void; and darkness was on the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters (Gen 1:1-2)

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(We have God―no doubt the Father-who created all things. “Heaven and earth” are opposites to indicate all things (merism). Then we have the Holy Spirit who is forming the mass of material that was created. Finally, when we read many times that God spoke things into existence, that was by His Word. Thus, we have Trinitarian creation.)

1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. 2 He was in the beginning with God. 3 All things were made through Him, and without Him nothing was made that was made. 4 In Him was life, and the life was the light of men. (John 1:1-4)

And the Word became flesh and Tabernacled among us, and we beheld His glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father, full of grace and truth. (John 1:14)

No one has seen God at any time. The only begotten Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, He has declared Him.

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(The phrase “in the beginning” in Gen. 1 means when all was created, whereas the same expression in John means in eternity. Yet John makes a connection with Gen. 1:1, proclaiming the Word as creator. Creation comes in v. 3. The four times “was” is used indicates eternal existence. The contrast is with the verb “became,” which indicates something new; namely, He added a human nature to His divine person. In other words, He always “was” the Word, always “was” with God, and always “was” God. Being “with God” indicates a distinction between the Word and God the Father. Being God indicates that He was (is) one in essence with the Father. The word “tabernacle” indicates that Jesus was the Old Testament tabernacle incarnate. Indeed, when John says “we beheld His glory,” he is speaking of the Shekinah glory in the tabernacle. Finally, “in Him was life” indicates that the Word had (has) inherent life; all creation has derived life.)

Verse 18, the verb “declared” from Greek means He has “exegeted” Him. The one who has seen Jesus has seen the Father (John 14:9).

15 He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation. 16 For by Him all things were created that are in heaven and that are on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or principalities or powers. All things were created through Him and for Him. 17 And He is before all things, and in Him all things consist. (Col 1:15-17)

. . . and by Him to reconcile all things to Himself, by Him, whether things on earth or things in heaven, having made peace through the blood of His cross (Col. 1:20)______________

(The word “firstborn” does not mean the one born first, but the one who is preeminent, who has the birthright, as with David who was called firstborn but was the eight of Jesse’s sons. “Heaven” and “earth” are repeated to make the connection with Genesis 1. We can see from the several merisms (opposite to mean totality) that the Son created all things without exception: in heaven, on earth; visible, invisible. Moreover, notice that the Son is the source of creation [“all things were created through Him”], the goal of creation [“for Him”], and He sustains creation [“in Him all things consist,” which means He providentially sustains all creation. See next column under Hebrews.]).

1 God, who at various times and in various ways spoke in time past to the fathers by the prophets, 2 has in these last days spoken to us [in] Son, whom He has appointed heir of all things, through whom also He made the worlds; 3 who being the brightness of His glory and the express image of His [essence], and upholding all things by the word of His power, when He had by Himself purged our sins, sat down at the right hand of the Majesty on high, 4 having become so much better than the angels, as He has by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they. (Heb 1:1-4)

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(The Son of God is the final revelation “in these last days,” which days are the last days of the old covenant, but now the new covenant has come (see Heb. 9:26). He is “the brightness of His glory” means a distinction between Father and Son. But when he writes “the express image of His essence” [not “person” as the NKJ says, definitely wrong], he means there is oneness of Father and Son in essence. In the midst of upholding all things, using His divine attributes, He “purged our sins,” then took His throne “at the right hand of the majesty on high.” The “sat down” means His work was done, in contrast to the Old Testament high priests who were never allowed to sit, for their sacrifices never ended. There were no places to sit in the tabernacle or temple.)