Who is Lord?

31 July 2018
( by Jim Williams ©)

In 1970, a musical called “Jesus Christ, Superstar” was released. It took the country by storm, bringing in a lot of money and praise from believers and non-believers alike. Most people were really taken with its music and its pseudo-theology. Some believers saw it differently, calling it blasphemy. I’ve kept that thought in mind through the years, wondering what was blasphemous, and what made that call a good one.

Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice concocted a musical masterpiece, the music still sticks with me. Sounding mostly like Webber’s style, it has some memorable melodies in it, for sure. But there is this question, the asking of which explains itself: “Jesus Christ, Jesus Christ, who are you, what have you sacrificed?” Good question! Jesus polled his disciples the very same first question in a conversation with his disciples: “Who do men say that I, the Son of Man, am?” (Matthew 16:13-17).

Peter answers the question correctly, and Jesus commends him, adding that Peter knew that because the Holy Spirit had told him so, not people. People didn’t know! Many years after the play was released, there was an interview with Tim Rice, one of the collaborators.

He explained that the piece was written from Judas Iscariot’s perspective. THAT EXPLAINS THE QUESTION! Judas had been the treasurer among the disciples, removing him from suspicion as being the betrayer, even at the Upper Room discourse. Jesus made him treasurer, so he was never thought of as not having Jesus’ best interests at heart. The disciples would have prevented him from betraying Jesus at the slightest thought of it, but as Jesus himself said, he did it “so Scripture could be fulfilled.”

We hear Yvonne Elliman singing the lyric “he’s just a man” in her song. THAT was the thought about him among people in His day, except those who had been forgiven and healed. The world refused Him as He presented himself, as Lord. To this day, the TV networks forbid the mention of His name in reference to God in their programming, because they go along with the idea.

Jesus being Healer is an easy concept to grasp, but healer BECAUSE he is God? That takes the Holy Spirit to say in a heart. It only happens when the heart is willing to accept it. The world never will, count on it. Peter, the character in this play, sings a whole litany of reasons and insights why Jesus as God didn’t make any sense, in that time, or this. “Israel in 4BC had no mass communication” is one line that sticks in memory. His manner and methods were madness to the world. The character and chorus sing out the question out of pure exasperation, coming from their logic as they do—”Jesus Christ, Jesus Christ, who are you? What have you sacrificed?” They call him Superstar, because Lord was not a term they would accept for him. It rendered them accountable to give Him his due, and they knew it. Despite His miracles and His claims, they still would not go there.

Jesus Christ Superstar is a magnificent expression of worldly acclaim, because he was only a superstar to them. So, who is HE to you?

Rescuing Verses . . . Woman Caught in Adultery

© Rev. Dr. Curtis I. Crenshaw (3 September 2018)

After 40 years of ministry in various churches, I have often heard people say that Jesus changed the law regarding the penalty for adultery. Here is the passage:

3 The scribes and the Pharisees brought a woman who had been caught in adultery, and placing her in the midst 4 they said to him, “Teacher, this woman has been caught in the act of adultery. 5 Now in the Law, Moses commanded us to stone such women. So what do you say?” 6 This they said to test him, that they might have some charge to bring against him. Jesus bent down and wrote with his finger on the ground. 7 And as they continued to ask him, he stood up and said to them, “Let him who is without sin among you be the first to throw a stone at her.” 8 And once more he bent down and wrote on the ground. 9 But when they heard it, they went away one by one, beginning with the older ones, and Jesus was left alone with the woman standing before him. 10 Jesus stood up and said to her, “Woman, where are they? Has no one condemned you?” 11 She said, “No one, Lord.” And Jesus said, “Neither do I condemn you; go, and from now on sin no more.” (John 8:3-11 ESV)

The passage is not in the earliest manuscripts. There are over 5,700 Greek manuscripts of the New Testament, though most of them are short and do not include the whole New Testament, and 900 of those manuscripts include these verses.

If the woman was caught in the act, so was the man. How could the woman be judged and not the man? Of course, that did not mean the woman was innocent. We hear constantly on the news that Hazel Woman or Jack Man was caught doing something but only one was charged. The conclusion often is that if both are not changed then both go free. But that is illogical to the core. If three men murder someone, but only two have sufficient evidence to be charged, does that mean the two should go free also? Should we let the two go free because we cannot find enough evidence to convict the third one? If we cannot convict all, does that mean we must not convict any? That is ridiculous on the face of it.

Others say that Jesus relaxed His Old Testament law. The Old Testament required execution for adultery in some cases: “The man who commits adultery with another man’s wife, he who commits adultery with his neighbor’s wife, the adulterer and the adulteress, shall surely be put to death” (Lev. 20:10 NKJ).

Moreover, the Old Testament law is a revelation of the character of God and cannot change: “You shall be holy; for I am holy” (Lev. 11:44-45; 1 Peter 1:16; NKJ). It is clear, therefore, that if God is unchangeable, and the law is a revelation of His holy character, then His law cannot change. But that did not mean that every case of sex outside marriage required the death penalty (see Deut. 22:13-30).

Notice that Jesus did not challenge Moses’ law, its holiness, or the penalty for adultery; rather, He supported it. He instituted formal proceedings against her when He said, “He who is without sin among you, let him throw a stone at her first.” Here is one passage He probably had in mind: “The hands of the witnesses shall be the first against him to put him to death, and afterward the hands of all the people. So you shall put away the evil from among you” (Deut. 17:7 NKJ; see also Lev. 24:24; Deut. 19:18-19; 22:22). We see that Jesus, in keeping with the law given above, required the witnesses to cast the first stone. This would make them back up their testimonies to death. Being a witness was a very serious matter.

Again, the witnesses were required to be innocent of the sin they were accusing someone else of committing. It was not any sin that someone must be guilty of but the sin in question, in this case, adultery. If being sinful of any sin whatsoever disqualified anyone from being a witness, no one would ever be such, for all humans are sinful.

When Jesus carefully applied the law, He saw that all the accusers had gone. Since there were no witnesses innocent of the same crime, the formal procedure had to stop. Jesus said,

9 But when they heard it, they went away one by one, beginning with the older ones, and Jesus was left alone with the woman standing before him. 10 Jesus stood up and said to her, “Woman, where are they? Has no one condemned you?” 11 She said, “No one, Lord.” And Jesus said, “Neither do I condemn you; go, and from now on sin no more.” (John 8:9-11 ESV)

There could be no formal accusation and no conviction if the witnesses were gone! The sin she was not to commit anymore was adultery.

 

Conclusion

Assuming John 7:53-8:11 is genuine (and I do), we see that Jesus followed the law. He could not compromise His own holy character by saying, in effect, stoning for adultery was too harsh in My law; therefore, I’ll lower the standard. There shall be no more stoning for adultery. He required the witnesses to be innocent of the same crime and to demonstrate their innocence by throwing the first stones. Let us NEVER put a division between the Old Testament and the New Testament as if there were two gods, an Old Testament one who was harsh and a New Testament one who was loving and kind. That would be idolatry. AMEN. Ω